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Building Your Diabetes Support Team

Diabetes can be overwhelming, but you do not have to go it alone. The theme of World Diabetes Day 2018 is “Family and Diabetes,” which has us thinking about the ways diabetes can actually help our families grow closer and healthier together. That may not have been what you thought of when you read the word diabetes, but it is true. Regular communication about our health and how we feel with those closest to us can have a positive impact for you and the ones you love. As you look at those around you to develop your team that can help you navigate your life with diabetes, the following is a list of the people...

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How to Talk to Your Doctor

Whether you’ve been living with diabetes for years or you’re newly diagnosed, communicating with your healthcare team is one of the best things you can do. If you’re nervous about opening up to your doctor or pharmacist, there are some good reasons to conquer these fears. Less communication leads to measurable increases in your stress, anxiety, and possible depression. It also leads, inevitably, to less frequent and less successful diabetes management.1 Since communicating with your healthcare providers is proven to be good for your health, here are some guidelines for starting the conversation and keeping it going....

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Exercise More

Exercise is good for everyone, but for people with diabetes, it can make a big difference in keeping your blood sugar level under control. Not only that, but staying active allows your cells to process insulin more efficiently, improving your overall A1C levels. The many benefits to staying active Exercise is one of the cornerstones of managing your diabetes, because the list of benefits for people with diabetes is long. Exercise can:1 Improve insulin sensitivity for people with type 12 Decrease the glucose in your blood for people with type 23 ...

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Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes represents more than 90% of all diabetes cases.1 In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas may make enough insulin, but the body cannot effectively use the insulin it creates. This is known as insulin resistance. Eventually, the pancreas may stop producing insulin altogether. Type 2 diabetes traditionally affects people later in life, but can affect people at any age. Additional risk factors or characteristics for type 2 diabetes include Family history of diabetes History of gestational diabetes Obesity Race/Ethnicity such as...

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Treatment

Diabetes does not have a cure, but it is treatable. With the proper treatment plan, you can reduce or even prevent the complications related to diabetes. Common treatments for diabetes include insulin injections, oral medications, diet and exercise. Work closely with your healthcare team to create the best treatment plan for you. Over time, hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) can cause health problems. Diabetes has been linked to: 1 Heart disease Heart attacks Strokes Kidney disease Nerve damage Digestive problems...

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Managing Sick Days

When you're feeling ill, you'd like nothing more than to lie in bed with a good book or movie. Yet that's when you need to focus even more on diabetes self-care. The key to sick days with diabetes is doing all of the thinking ahead of time. That way, when you don't feel like concentrating, you can simply follow the plan.  What to include in your plan Involve your diabetes care healthcare team in developing your sick day plan —ask them when you should call for help, how often you should check your blood glucose and ketones, what medicines to take and what to eat. ...

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Oral Treatment

Many people with type 2 diabetes still create insulin, but their bodies either do not make enough or do not use it as effectively as they should. Often, healthcare professionals start people with diabetes on a therapy of diet and exercise. If these are not enough, the healthcare professional may prescribe oral medications. If medication still does help control blood sugar levels, insulin may be added to a person’s therapy. Today’s oral drugs offer more options for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Because various medications work in different ways, healthcare professionals may be able to add drugs together for better...

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Maintaining a Healthy Weight

If you have diabetes, maintaining a healthy weight positively impacts your health.1 It is important to involve your healthcare professional in weight-loss efforts. This is especially important if you have type 1 diabetes, because losing weight involves virtually every aspect of your diabetes self-care program, including your meal plan, physical activity and insulin requirements. Some people gain weight when they begin using insulin, as your body may be trying to restore itself to a healthy weight. By working with your healthcare professional, you can set up a plan to maintain a healthy weight and achieve weight-loss...

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Managing Diabetes in the Workplace

Diabetes does not have to limit who you are or what you are able to accomplish. In fact, having this condition means that you have a lot to offer others. By talking about diabetes with family, friends or people at the office, you can help them better understand the complications you face each day, while gaining their respect and support. Having said that diabetes is 24/7 and for those of us who take care of diabetes every day, life can be complicated—a lot more complicated than a person who doesn't have diabetes. Every item you eat, every activity you perform and even just vegging in front of the TV requires consideration,...

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